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Posts Tagged ‘Institute for Human Science and Culture’

contributed by Tony Pankuch (Archives Assistant)

Since beginning my work as a staff member of the CCHP earlier this year, much of my focus has been directed toward the increased accessibility of our museum and archival resources. Though changes to the design and content of museum exhibits are primarily long-term projects for our team, I have been able to work with my colleagues to develop a number of informational resources for museum visitors relating to the accessibility of our physical facilities.

We will begin publishing most of these resources when the museum reopens, but for right now, I’d like to give you a preview of what you can expect to see.

Preview of the CCHP accessibility web page, featuring an Accessibility and Inclusion Statement.
Preview of the CCHP Accessibility page.

Accessibility Webpage

My colleagues and I have worked to compile information on the CCHP’s current state of accessibility into a single location on our website. This page includes an Accessibility & Inclusion Statement that will guide our future efforts and contact information for all accessibility-related inquiries. The page also includes information on the Museums For All initiative, which will provide reduced admission to guests presenting a state-issued EBT card at the admissions desk. Within this space, we have striven to be honest about the current realities of the museum in regards to physical accessibility.

Unlike the resources below, the Accessibility page is available now.

Preview of the CCHP Visitor’s Guide, featuring an image of the museum entrance and the guide’s “Exploring the Museum” section.
Preview of the CCHP Visitor’s Guide.

Visitor’s Guide

A Visitor’s Guide will be available online for those interested in visiting the National Museum of Psychology and Institute for Human Science and Culture galleries. This guide will provide visitors with detailed information on travel, parking, physical facilities, and museum content. Photos will be included to illustrate all parts of the museum experience.

Preview of the National Museum of Psychology maps, side-by-side. Icons on the second map show the location of different types of exhibits.
Preview of the Museum Map. Left: Standard Map; Right: Detailed Sensory Map.

Museum Map

In addition to the Visitor’s Guide, maps of the National Museum of Psychology will be offered on our website and in print form at the museum’s admissions desk. These maps will exist in two varieties. The first is a basic map detailing the layout of the museum and the location of key amenities, such as restrooms and seating. The second will include more detailed information on the locations of hands-on exhibits and displays, audio sources and noisier areas, and audio/visual elements currently lacking closed captioning or alternative forms of access. This second map, along with the visitor’s guide, is designed to give visitors an idea of the sensory atmosphere and limitations of the museum in its current state.

These initial resources are centered on offering clear, accurate, and easy-to-find information regarding the accessibility of the CCHP. Moving forward, we will begin working toward the improvement of our physical facilities and digital offerings.

Of course, the most important people in all of this are you, our patrons and visitors. What can we do to make the CCHP more accessible for you? What information would you like to see on our website and social media? Let us know in the comments, or email us at ahap@uakron.edu.

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contributed by Kristie Zachar, Museums & Archives Studies student and CCHP Student Assistant.

A sneak peek at some Bloomingdale’s bags in the Lee L. Forman Collection of Bags.

We don’t think about them much, but bags play a pretty big role in the lives of Americans everywhere. We use them practically every day, and we use them for a number of different reasons, but you have to admit, they’re not something you would actively think about. While we could surely say plenty about bags, starting with what exactly is a bag and what do we use them for, a different question would be what exactly do they say about us? This year, the Institute for Human Science & Culture will be opening a new exhibit titled “Cultural Carry-On: America’s Literal Baggage” that manages to answer that question for us.

“Cultural Carry-On” student-designed logo
Framed bag with painted portrait of Lee L. Forman.

The exhibit has been put together by students of the Museums and Archives Certificate Program at the University of Akron as their final project for the Foundations of Museums and Archives II course (1900:302) which is held at the Institute. Students chose from the 12,000 bags and other bag-related items in the Lee L. Forman Bag Collection, picking items that they found interesting and later finding that the seemingly unconnected bags they had chosen helped to create a larger, multi-sided view of American culture.

 The exhibit puts this view on display as it explores the various uses of bags as advertising, merchandise, memorabilia, and more, and how they reflect the different facets of American culture from food industries to music to politics and even to the evolution of bag manufacturing itself. The “Cultural Carry-On” exhibit dives deep to find the weird and fascinating stories behind these bags and their cultural connections in a creative and unique take on American culture that you won’t find anywhere else.

4th floor galleries at the Cummings Center: the space that will soon exhibit the students’ hard work on the Lee L. Forman Collection of Bags.

The students have been working hard in preparation for the exhibit’s opening in Spring 2020, but unfortunately, due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, plans for the exhibit have had to change, and it will no longer be opening May 7, 2020. The exhibit will still be opening at some point in the future when staff are able to return to the site, but as of now, there is no set date. Students are continuing to work and plan the exhibit remotely and are looking forward to sharing their work with the public as soon as they are able.

For additional information about the exhibit, watch for updates on the Cummings Center Facebook page.

For additional information about the Museums and Archives Studies Certificate program, please contact Dr. Jodi Kearns at jkearns@uakron.edu or visit https://uakron.edu/chp/education/museums-and-archivescertificate.dot.

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-contributed by Emily Gainer & Jodi Kearns.

In 2010, the CCHP moved into the former Roadway building.  Over the past 9 years, renovations have been made to every floor of the building, and we’re excited to announce that renovations are complete!

The Drs. Nicholas A. and Dorothy M. Cummings Center for the History of Psychology is the home of the Archives of the History of American Psychology, the National Museum of Psychology, and the Institute for Human Science and Culture (IHSC).  The final renovations were completed on the 3rd and 4th floors, which house the IHSC. The IHSC is a multidisciplinary institute that promotes education and research in the history, preservation, documentation, and interpretation of the human experience. The mission of the IHSC is to explore the human condition through document/object-based, experiential education in arts, humanities, and science.

During the year-long renovations, we took photographs to document the changes and keep a record of our own history.  Here are before and after photographs:

Exterior upgrades, including window replacement and additional lighting, were a part of the renovations on the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology building.

 

The 3rd floor of the IHSC includes classroom spaces.  The Museums and Archives Certificate Program, along with other courses, will be taught here beginning Fall 2019.

 

The 3rd floor also includes a conference room.

 

One of the most interesting architectural elements of the building spans the 3rd and 4th floors. This atrium includes wall space suitable for exhibit installation.

 

An important part of the renovations was the addition of a stairway connecting the 3rd and 4th floors. Construction crews cut through the concrete between the floors and added this staircase.

 

A front view of the stairway.  Notice the reinforcement and construction supports in the before photograph.  Lots of planning went into this architectural element!

 

The 4th floor of the IHSC includes two gallery spaces that are open to the public.  A reception desk was added and sits immediately off the elevator.

 

Reclaimed barn wood from Pennsylvania was used throughout the 3rd and 4th floors.  It was incorporated into the wall details and used to create unique benches for extra seating.

 

The 4th floor library is already open to the public on Wednesdays (11am-4pm) and Thursdays (11am-8pm) where the David P. Campbell Postcard Collection and the Brozek Slavic and Germanic Language Cultural Books are available for use and research. Soon, other key collections of the IHSC will be relocated into the 3rd floor stacks, including the Jim and Vanita Oelschlager Native American Ethnographic Collection and the Lee L. Forman Collection of Bags.

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Contributed by Rhonda Rinehart.

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What’s the connection between the Center for the History of Psychology and National Postcard Week? Well, about 200,000 postcards donated to the CHP. In honor of National Postcard Week and Dr. David P. Campbell who donated his collection of postcards to CHP, we are taking you on a behind-the-scenes tour of this vast collection of postcards that says as much about the art and psychology of collecting as the cards themselves say about cultural history.

This vast collection has been acquired by Dr. Campbell over three decades and represents an historical look at natural and human science as well as global society and culture encompassing a variety of themes and images. These images have been used by Dr. Campbell to explore multiculturalism and increase multicultural awareness.

IMAGES FROM THE CAMPBELL PICTURE POSTCARD DECK

IMAGES FROM THE CAMPBELL PICTURE POSTCARD DECK

IMAGES FROM THE CAMPBELL PICTURE POSTCARD DECK

IMAGES FROM THE CAMPBELL PICTURE POSTCARD DECK

IMAGES FROM THE CAMPBELL PICTURE POSTCARD DECK

IMAGES FROM THE CAMPBELL PICTURE POSTCARD DECK

Last month, Dr. Campbell visited the CHP to help organize his large collection, and to get acquainted with the new space designated for the postcards. We worked hard to organize by material type, artist, theme, people, geographical place, and subject. When all was finished, CHP had 182 linear feet of postcards from the 1800s to as late as 2008, all contained in 3-ring binders or postcard boxes to be viewed and studied by all.

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A particularly interesting find among the thousands of postcards, is the Piano Playing Duck, a postcard created for Animal Behavior Enterprises, Inc. in Hot Springs, Arkansas. The image of a mallard duck turning on a light before he begins to play piano can also be seen along with animal performing props, advertisements, and manuscripts from the company right here at CHP! The Animal Behavior Enterprises collection includes many images of performing animals trained by animal psychologists Keller Breland and Marion Breland Bailey.

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As the newly-created Institute for Human Science and Culture at the CHP is launched, this collection seems even more relevant to the interconnectedness between psychology, culture, and natural science. CHP is pleased to have this representation of cultural history throughout the world as a significant contribution to the Institute.

ASYLUM POSTCARDS COMPLEMENT THE ASYLUM REPORTS COLLECTION ON PERMANENT LOAN TO THE CHP FROM CUSHING MEMORIAL LIBRARY

ASYLUM POSTCARDS COMPLEMENT THE ASYLUM REPORTS COLLECTION ON PERMANENT LOAN TO THE CHP FROM CUSHING MEMORIAL LIBRARY

ASYLUM POSTCARDS COMPLEMENT THE ASYLUM REPORTS COLLECTION ON PERMANENT LOAN TO THE CHP FROM CUSHING MEMORIAL LIBRARY

ASYLUM POSTCARDS COMPLEMENT THE ASYLUM REPORTS COLLECTION ON PERMANENT LOAN TO THE CHP FROM CUSHING MEMORIAL LIBRARY

POSTCARDS DEPICTING DREAMS

POSTCARDS DEPICTING DREAMS

POSTCARDS DEPICTING DREAMS

POSTCARDS DEPICTING DREAMS

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