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Archive for the ‘Institute for Human Science & Culture’ Category

This two-part post from guest blogger Linda Bussey, Director of the Hower House Museum in Akron, discusses how to care for vintage textiles like linens and table cloths.

Now that your textiles are cleaned, you can safely display or store them. Please be mindful that these vintage items should not be displayed in direct sunlight or in an overly hot or damp area. Otherwise their unhappiness will become evident with fading or mildew.

Also remember that if these pieces are used, they must periodically be gently rewashed. Hand towels will become especially high maintenance. It might be best to have a “do not use” policy for vintage towels.

For safely storing your vintage treasures, you will need a few things:

  • Archival tissue paper or 100% cotton muslin fabric
  • Acid -free/archival storage boxes or
  • Polypropylene plastic storage bin with a lid. Be sure to look for this symbol on the bottom of the bin, indicating it is safe for storing textiles:

The acid-free/archival tissue and storage boxes may be obtained from a museum supply or from a craft supply store. Acid-free photo storage boxes may be used for small items but loosely wrap the contents in acid-free tissue or cotton fabric. Do not store with photos. Cotton fabric may be purchased from a fabric store or online and be pre-washed in unscented laundry soap without fabric softener and dried without use of dryer sheets. The fabric will be a bit wrinkled as a result, but do not despair! You can try out your new pressing skills as outlined here in the quick reference guide!

Regarding storage in a plastic bin, yes, it sounds a bit strange, I know. However, a bin of the polypropylene (PP) variety is fine for fabric storage, and may be obtained at discount stores. There is a long list of other, non-safe plastics that should not be used, such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC).

Now that you have your supplies gathered, let’s discuss how best to package the items to keep them safe and happy. Prepare a large flat surface to fold or roll the item(s). If you plan to fold them, they should be cushioned to avoid creasing, which can stress the fibers. Use acid -free tissue paper or cotton fabric scrunched up to form a small roll where the item is folded. Once folded or rolled, loosely wrap the item(s) in acid -free paper or cotton fabric, particularly if multiple items will be stored together.

Place items in an acid-free archival box or in a safe storage bin (as noted above). If rolled items are too large for a storage container, fold diagonally with the more delicate side of the item to the inside of the packet; this will help alleviate wear and tear on the more fragile stitching and surface embellishments. Make sure the container is slightly larger than needed to avoid overcrowding. Larger items, such as bedspreads, coverlets, or quilts may need to be stored separately. As always, store in a moderately temperate, dry area, away from direct sunlight, extreme cold or heat.

On a final note, be kind to your textile treasures. Remember to “visit” them occasionally to see how they are holding up. Unfurl them and let them air out for an hour or so. Whi le that is happening, be sure to examine the storage container to look for evidence of insect activity. Not my idea of a good time, either, but check anyway. Your textiles might need an intervention and to be freshened up with new wrappings. Wipe out the storage containers with a damp cloth and let air dry before carefully refolding them in a different direction, rewrapping and returning them to the container.

Having vintage textiles is a serious commitment—sometimes tedious—but well worth it . Cared for correctly, they will provide years of enjoyment and given a new lease on life because you put in the effort.

Textile Sachet Recipe

Follow this recipe and instructions for making a sachet that not only smells good, but protects your textiles from cloth-destroying pests.

Sachet ingredients: lavender, spearmint, bay leaves
Filling the sachet bag

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This two-part post from guest blogger Linda Bussey, Director of the Hower House Museum in Akron, discusses how to care for vintage textiles like linens and table cloths.

Imagine inheriting a collection of vintage linens from a favorite auntie. Perhaps she was the most influential person in your life—a bit eccentric, ahead of her time—a colorful character who influenced the YOU of today. Of course, honoring and keeping her memory alive is now emotionally invested in those textiles. No pressure here!

This blog will give you a starting place when dealing with vintage textiles, much of it learned from one of those eccentric, special people in my own life. I try to honor her memory by teaching others what I learned then and since. (Thank you, Sue!)

Start by separating the textile pieces according to their use—pillowcases, dresser scarves, hand towels, doilies, tablecloths and napkins— and then assess the condition of each individual piece. Take your time and be gentle. Remember that someone made each of these items. They have a history and had a life before they came into yours.

A sampler of linens from Hower House Museum

Some pieces may be in great shape, others not so much. In the era these vintage goodies were made, it was a common practice to store old linens ironed and starched within an inch of their life, using a homemade solution made from potatoes, rice or sugar water. Along the way, the items may have been stored in less than optimal conditions—damp basements, attics, cardboard boxes, in old suitcases or trunks. None of these situations bodes well for old textiles; the starch attracts insects and mice, resulting in damage.

Examples of rust stains on linens

At this point I should tell you that old textiles should be stored as you would your best clothing—in a cool, dry place, away from direct sunlight and extreme heat or cold.

If your linens are in good shape, great! If not, some mending and/or stain removal may be in order. Minor repairs—small holes, tears, fraying or loose edging—will need your attention before cleaning. If you are unsure how to repair antique or vintage fabrics, best to ask around; find someone to teach you. Be aware that hand sewing takes a bit of patience, but is a useful skill.

After this initial review of the pieces and mending if necessary, proceed with a gentle washing of your textiles. How do you determine what may be safely washed? We know that cotton, linen, and poly blend cottons may be safely washed by hand; never machine wash fragile, vintage, or antique fabrics. If they are light in color, do not wash with dark fabrics. Some of the old dyes that were used were unstable and may “bleed out” in the wash process. For example, if you have a dark blue blanket, you would not wash that with a light-colored dresser scarf. You see where I’m going with this, right? You could end up with a blue blanket and a light blue dresser scarf.

If you are not sure if the pieces should be washed, ask a professional. What do I recommend to use for your own personal collection? A mild soap called Orvus WA paste. A white, creamy paste that comes in a large container, it can be purchased from a museum supply store, but the more economical source, believe it or not, is your local farm supply store! Orvus WA is used as a horse shampoo, concentrated yet gentle. It only requires a small amount for a batch of linens, so share with a friend because a container will last you years, unless you have several horses to shampoo on a regular basis!

Mild Orvus WA Paste used for cleaning fragile linens and textiles
Supplies for hand-washing your linens. Clockwise from left: clean, absorbent towel for drying; nylon screen for protection of linens during washing; kitchen timer; Orvus WA paste; disposable gloves

Check out this reference guide for a more detailed list of basic supplies and detailed instructions on all phases of textile care.

My next post will deal with the “aftermath” of the washing process, such as how to safely press and store your newly-cleaned treasures. Truly not as boring as it sounds!

Online resources http://anacostia.si.edu/exhibits/online_academy/academy/preserve/preservemain.htm

https://www.ohiohistory.org/preserve/state-historic-preservation-office

Books

Hamby, D.S. The American Cotton Handbook. 3rd ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons. 1965.

McGehee, L. Creating Texture with Textiles. Iola, WI: Krause Publications. 1998.

Morton, W.E. and J.W.S. Hearle. Physical Properties of Textile Fibres. 4th ed. Cambridge, England: Woodhead Publishing Ltd. 2008

Pizzuto, J.J. Fabric Science. 11th ed. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing. 2015.

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contributed by Tony Pankuch (Archives Assistant)

Since beginning my work as a staff member of the CCHP earlier this year, much of my focus has been directed toward the increased accessibility of our museum and archival resources. Though changes to the design and content of museum exhibits are primarily long-term projects for our team, I have been able to work with my colleagues to develop a number of informational resources for museum visitors relating to the accessibility of our physical facilities.

We will begin publishing most of these resources when the museum reopens, but for right now, I’d like to give you a preview of what you can expect to see.

Preview of the CCHP accessibility web page, featuring an Accessibility and Inclusion Statement.
Preview of the CCHP Accessibility page.

Accessibility Webpage

My colleagues and I have worked to compile information on the CCHP’s current state of accessibility into a single location on our website. This page includes an Accessibility & Inclusion Statement that will guide our future efforts and contact information for all accessibility-related inquiries. The page also includes information on the Museums For All initiative, which will provide reduced admission to guests presenting a state-issued EBT card at the admissions desk. Within this space, we have striven to be honest about the current realities of the museum in regards to physical accessibility.

Unlike the resources below, the Accessibility page is available now.

Preview of the CCHP Visitor’s Guide, featuring an image of the museum entrance and the guide’s “Exploring the Museum” section.
Preview of the CCHP Visitor’s Guide.

Visitor’s Guide

A Visitor’s Guide will be available online for those interested in visiting the National Museum of Psychology and Institute for Human Science and Culture galleries. This guide will provide visitors with detailed information on travel, parking, physical facilities, and museum content. Photos will be included to illustrate all parts of the museum experience.

Preview of the National Museum of Psychology maps, side-by-side. Icons on the second map show the location of different types of exhibits.
Preview of the Museum Map. Left: Standard Map; Right: Detailed Sensory Map.

Museum Map

In addition to the Visitor’s Guide, maps of the National Museum of Psychology will be offered on our website and in print form at the museum’s admissions desk. These maps will exist in two varieties. The first is a basic map detailing the layout of the museum and the location of key amenities, such as restrooms and seating. The second will include more detailed information on the locations of hands-on exhibits and displays, audio sources and noisier areas, and audio/visual elements currently lacking closed captioning or alternative forms of access. This second map, along with the visitor’s guide, is designed to give visitors an idea of the sensory atmosphere and limitations of the museum in its current state.

These initial resources are centered on offering clear, accurate, and easy-to-find information regarding the accessibility of the CCHP. Moving forward, we will begin working toward the improvement of our physical facilities and digital offerings.

Of course, the most important people in all of this are you, our patrons and visitors. What can we do to make the CCHP more accessible for you? What information would you like to see on our website and social media? Let us know in the comments, or email us at ahap@uakron.edu.

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contributed by Kristie Zachar, Museums & Archives Studies student and CCHP Student Assistant.

A sneak peek at some Bloomingdale’s bags in the Lee L. Forman Collection of Bags.

We don’t think about them much, but bags play a pretty big role in the lives of Americans everywhere. We use them practically every day, and we use them for a number of different reasons, but you have to admit, they’re not something you would actively think about. While we could surely say plenty about bags, starting with what exactly is a bag and what do we use them for, a different question would be what exactly do they say about us? This year, the Institute for Human Science & Culture will be opening a new exhibit titled “Cultural Carry-On: America’s Literal Baggage” that manages to answer that question for us.

“Cultural Carry-On” student-designed logo
Framed bag with painted portrait of Lee L. Forman.

The exhibit has been put together by students of the Museums and Archives Certificate Program at the University of Akron as their final project for the Foundations of Museums and Archives II course (1900:302) which is held at the Institute. Students chose from the 12,000 bags and other bag-related items in the Lee L. Forman Bag Collection, picking items that they found interesting and later finding that the seemingly unconnected bags they had chosen helped to create a larger, multi-sided view of American culture.

 The exhibit puts this view on display as it explores the various uses of bags as advertising, merchandise, memorabilia, and more, and how they reflect the different facets of American culture from food industries to music to politics and even to the evolution of bag manufacturing itself. The “Cultural Carry-On” exhibit dives deep to find the weird and fascinating stories behind these bags and their cultural connections in a creative and unique take on American culture that you won’t find anywhere else.

4th floor galleries at the Cummings Center: the space that will soon exhibit the students’ hard work on the Lee L. Forman Collection of Bags.

The students have been working hard in preparation for the exhibit’s opening in Spring 2020, but unfortunately, due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, plans for the exhibit have had to change, and it will no longer be opening May 7, 2020. The exhibit will still be opening at some point in the future when staff are able to return to the site, but as of now, there is no set date. Students are continuing to work and plan the exhibit remotely and are looking forward to sharing their work with the public as soon as they are able.

For additional information about the exhibit, watch for updates on the Cummings Center Facebook page.

For additional information about the Museums and Archives Studies Certificate program, please contact Dr. Jodi Kearns at jkearns@uakron.edu or visit https://uakron.edu/chp/education/museums-and-archivescertificate.dot.

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-contribué par Dr. Jodi Kearns (IHSC Director) et Mme. Lisa Ong (Copley High School AP French Teacher); avec des remerciements particuliers aux University of Akron student Kristie Zachar (French minor) & UA grad Nicole Orchosky (former CHS AP French student).

Au printemps 2020, l’Institute for Human Science & Culture a demandé à la classe de Français AP de Copley High School de l’aide à traduire des cartes postales francophones qui appartiennent à la David P. Campbell Postcard Collection.

During Spring 2020, the Institute for Human Science & Culture asked the AP French class at Copley High School for some help translating French-language postcards from the David P. Campbell Postcard Collection.

Certaines cartes postales ont une légende.

Some postcards have French captions printed on them that the students translated.

FrenchPostcards_07A
an example of a postcard with a French poem printed on the card

Et certaines possèdent un message écrit à la main par l’expéditeur.

And some postcards have hand-written messages from the sender.

FrenchPostcards_13B
an example of a hand-written French-language message on a postcard

Les étudiants passaient du temps à récrire ce qu’ils voyaient dans l’écriture ancienne de cent ans et puis à traduire ce qui a été écrit.

The AP French students found it useful to rewrite what they were seeing in the 100-year-old handwriting before translating what was written.

An AP French student’s notes. First, the message on the postcard is rewritten in her own hand; then, the message is translated.

C’était une vraie épreuve de leurs connaissances de la langue française de trouver un sens aux traductions littérales

This exercise was a true test of their French-language knowledge to find meaning in literal translations.

Allez au blog de l’institut pour lire des traductions et des réactions personnelles.

Hop on over to the Institute’s blog to read some of the translations and personal reactions.

The students’ work will be integrated into the Cummings Center digital repository of postcards. Merci Mme. Ong!

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~ contributed by Janos Jalics, Museums & Archives Studies student at the University of Akron completing a Capstone project at Hower House Museum under the supervision of Linda Bussey, HHM Director, and under faculty advisement of Dr. Greg Wilson, Department of History

Yes, that is a lame pun for history, but I thought the question was a great place to start. Everyone has heard of the armchair historian, the man or woman who sees history in a book and has multiple years’ worth of hindsight to any event they read about. For instance, it is far easier to say today that the Nazis would fail to invade the USSR today than to say that in 1941. The German Army was considered nearly invincible with their rapid conquests and the Soviet Army was considered pathetic for failing to defeat Finland in a month. For many years, I hoped to break away from this stereotype by seeing history in person, grabbing a perspective that is too absent from the perspective of that comfortable armchair.  

My first real chance to see history in person was when my dad took my sister and I to Europe for the second time. We visited Rome, Budapest, and London over the next three weeks. I was awed by such notable artifacts as the Appian Way, the Colosseum, the Battersea Shield, Buda Castle, etc. You never know what it is like to see the culture or civilization you read about until you see it in person, making this vacation a historian’s mad dash for a reunion with cousins that he/she never met. This experience pushed me to always visit a city’s nearest museum when on vacation just to acquire a new understanding of history and that is what got me to an internship at Hower House. 

I came to Hower House as a Junior History Major looking for an internship. I did not know too much about local history and I needed valuable experience in my field. Visiting the historic home and museum showed me just how powerful and influential the Howers were in Akron’s history. It showed me an experience with local history that I had only had with U.S. or world history before then aside from the Perkins Mansion. A year later, I got the internship to fulfill requirements of my Museums and Archives Studies Certificate. Every day since the start of this internship, I entered books from the museum’s collection into the database, helping to preserve them and make them more available to the public. Entering the books has been somewhat tedious since the process rarely changes, if ever. However, the chance to see history as it was always makes the story behind any given event quite rewarding.

One particular book interested me: Daring Twins by Lyman Frank Baum. I googled the author just like I had done with several of the authors in the collection because his name sounded strangely familiar.

Lyman Frank Baum, c1899, age 43

My next visit to the place was welcomed with Linda showing me a copy of Baum’s Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.

Hower House Museum copy of Mother Goose in Prose, published 1897 in Chicago

The author had signed the copy when the Hower Family visited him in Chicago.

Inscription from Mr. Baum to
“To my young friend
Master Hower
With compliments and good
wishes of the Author
L. Frank Baum
Chicago 1898″

I realized that this made the Howers so influential that they got a copy of Baum’s book decades before he became famous.

L. Frank Baum’s “Young friend, Master Hower”
John Bruot Hower
son of Milton Otis and Blanche Bruot Howard
11 years old in 1903

Understanding local history suddenly became that much more meaningful to me. I hope to have many more similar experiences as an intern for the Hower House. 

The Hower House Museum is open to the public, so check out their website for open hours, guided tours, and other events. Or email howerhouse@uakron.edu if you have a reference or research question.

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contributed by Dr. Jodi Kearns & Dr. Hillary Nunn.

Did you know that the Institute for Human Science and Culture publishes a second blog for the Cummings Center? The IHSC blog showcases student writing and observations from the IHSC collections.

This semester, our Museums and Archives Studies students, again had the chance to spend some time in the David P. Campbell Postcard Collection.

dreamsbog2

The IHSC 4th Floor Library features the David P. Campbell Postcard Collection

The students wrote metadata for a set of postcards sorted into a binder labelled Dreams, adding to our growing digital repository and providing access to a collection that is otherwise available in-person only with limited hours.

dreamsbog1

The “Dreams” postcard binder is one of over one hundred subsets of the David P. Campbell Postcard Collection that were organized and categorized by the donor.

Have a look at the interesting things the students discovered in their postcards and metadata:

Is That Woman Dead?

Disney, Spanish, and a Postcard Addiction

The Universal Language

The Music Man in the Mail: the Story Behind the Art

The Divine at Work

Spirit Photography on a Postcard

You May Say I’m a Dreamer

Viewing the Past in Living Color

Postcard Adventure…and Believe Me, This Has Been an Adventure

Gone but Not Forgotten

Paul Fink, Berlin

Additionally, Dr. Amy Galloway of Appalachian State University reached out to us this past summer for service learning opportunities for her History of Psychology students. One student, Ballard Reynolds, wrote metadata for 90 of the Dreams postcards and wrote a blog about some observations: The Interpretation of Dreams Postcards.

We hope you enjoy, and we please bookmark the IHSC blog for future musings.

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-contributed by Emily Gainer & Jodi Kearns.

In 2010, the CCHP moved into the former Roadway building.  Over the past 9 years, renovations have been made to every floor of the building, and we’re excited to announce that renovations are complete!

The Drs. Nicholas A. and Dorothy M. Cummings Center for the History of Psychology is the home of the Archives of the History of American Psychology, the National Museum of Psychology, and the Institute for Human Science and Culture (IHSC).  The final renovations were completed on the 3rd and 4th floors, which house the IHSC. The IHSC is a multidisciplinary institute that promotes education and research in the history, preservation, documentation, and interpretation of the human experience. The mission of the IHSC is to explore the human condition through document/object-based, experiential education in arts, humanities, and science.

During the year-long renovations, we took photographs to document the changes and keep a record of our own history.  Here are before and after photographs:

Exterior upgrades, including window replacement and additional lighting, were a part of the renovations on the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology building.

 

The 3rd floor of the IHSC includes classroom spaces.  The Museums and Archives Certificate Program, along with other courses, will be taught here beginning Fall 2019.

 

The 3rd floor also includes a conference room.

 

One of the most interesting architectural elements of the building spans the 3rd and 4th floors. This atrium includes wall space suitable for exhibit installation.

 

An important part of the renovations was the addition of a stairway connecting the 3rd and 4th floors. Construction crews cut through the concrete between the floors and added this staircase.

 

A front view of the stairway.  Notice the reinforcement and construction supports in the before photograph.  Lots of planning went into this architectural element!

 

The 4th floor of the IHSC includes two gallery spaces that are open to the public.  A reception desk was added and sits immediately off the elevator.

 

Reclaimed barn wood from Pennsylvania was used throughout the 3rd and 4th floors.  It was incorporated into the wall details and used to create unique benches for extra seating.

 

The 4th floor library is already open to the public on Wednesdays (11am-4pm) and Thursdays (11am-8pm) where the David P. Campbell Postcard Collection and the Brozek Slavic and Germanic Language Cultural Books are available for use and research. Soon, other key collections of the IHSC will be relocated into the 3rd floor stacks, including the Jim and Vanita Oelschlager Native American Ethnographic Collection and the Lee L. Forman Collection of Bags.

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contributed by Rose Stull & Laura Loop, students in the Museums & Archives Certificate Program.

The students in Foundations of Museums and Archives II have been working hard all semester, and invite you to attend our exhibit: How Animal Subjects Shaped Psychology, which opens on May 9 from 2:30-4:30pm.

The term “animal subjects” might make you think of those red-eyed, white rats in a laboratory. The history of animal subjects used in psychology is actually much broader than rats. Psychologists have conducted research using birds, insects, fish, and much more in addition to rats. Animal subjects have played an essential role in understanding “the basic principles and processes that underlie the behavior of all creatures, both human and nonhuman.” (Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in the Care and Use of Animals, American Psychological Association)

The Archives for the History of American Psychology houses many artifacts that were used in research with animal subjects. Some of the objects are part of larger collections with plenty of archival and primary source materials to help us identify them. However, others had very little information to begin with, and it was up to us to figure it out. The hardest part for some of the objects was just figuring out what it was. Are you able to figure out what these objects could be?

1

What is this rack of droppers?

2

Meat powder?

We had a general idea what most of the objects were used for but we still needed more. What was the object used for? Who used it? What kind of research were they doing? What were the findings of their research? We started in the archives and found a lot of what we were looking for, then expanded our research elsewhere to fill in the gaps.

Some of us learned about the history of experimental psychology for the first time. There are so many fabulous photographs.

3

Gilbert Gottlieb ducklings

For example, Gilbert Gottlieb’s work with ducklings in his years of imprinting research has produced a multitude of amazing photographs (such as the photo shown above), which will be on display alongside many other archival materials regarding animal subjects.  A great example of this was the Animal Behavior Enterprises and their IQ Zoo. To learn more about this interesting tourist attraction and to see if you correctly identified these objects, the exhibit will be open through summer 2019.

4

The fortune-telling chicken of the IQ Zoo

Working alongside our classmates with the wonderful staff at the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology has given us opportunity for hands-on experience that will give us better advantage in our respective fields of study at The University of Akron, and after graduation when we’re job hunting.  We are proud to invite everybody to join us for the opening of How Animal Subjects Shaped Psychology.

Opening Reception:

May 9th, 2019 from 2:30-4:30 pm

Free admission for the opening event. *Regular admission fees for the National Museum of Psychology during opening.

Location:

Institute for Human Science & Culture Galleries, RDWY 4th Floor

Drs. Nicholas & Dorothy Cummings Center for the History of Psychology; The University of Akron Roadway Building; 73 S. College Street Akron, OH 44325-4302

Contact: ihsc@uakron.edu ; 330-972-7285

This project fulfills the requirements for students in 1900:302 Foundations of Museums and Archives II at the Institute for Human Science and Culture. Contact Dr. Jodi Kearns jkearns@uakron.edu for information about the program.

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contributed by Aubrey Baldwin, Phillip Fischio, Anthony Greenaway, Laura Loop, and Katelynn Olsen (students in the Museums & Archives Certificate Program).

Fire, arson, danger. Most people don’t associate these words with children; however the work of George A. Sakheim might suggest otherwise.

Card taken from Sakheim’s original collection, which states his research. Box M6591; Folder 1

 

George A. Sakheim, a clinical psychologist, did most of his research on the fire-setting behaviors of children during the 1970s to the early 2000s. Dr. Sakheim’s discoveries led to various published works on child arsonists. Overall, his work contributed to a greater understanding of a topic that previously was not well understood.

Most of the information was garnered through therapy sessions with minor fire-setter case studies.  Many of the children that Dr. Sakheim worked with suffered from mental illness, which may have contributed to their fire-setting behaviors. Part of his work involved assessing the level of risk exhibited by each child. He ranked each patient as minor, moderate, or severe. Dr. Sakheim performed many different tests to create these rankings. One such test was an exercise allowing the children to draw something associated to what they were discussing in therapy.

Example of a patient’s drawing. Box M6592; Folder 11

 

The various cases that Dr. Sakheim reviewed of child and adolescent fire-setters made him an expert on the subject. His expertise secured him a consulting position with the New York State Office of Developmental Disabilities and Mental Retardation. He also wrote several books and articles on the topic, helping the psychological community gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. 

Juvenile Firesetters in Residential Treatment by George A. Sakheim et al. Box M6609; Folder 2

 

Dr. Sakheim’s archival papers documenting this work are now available at the Cumming’s Center for the History of Psychology. The papers contain 20 letter size document cases and 1 record storage box, all relating to Dr. Sakheim’s work. All of the patient files are restricted, including cassette tapes of interviews with firesetters, but Dr. Sakheim’s research and written works are open for research.  View the finding aid for the George Sakheim papers for more details.

The processing of this archival collection fulfilled requirements for students enrolled in the course Foundations of Museums and Archives I.

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