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Archive for April, 2019

– contributed by CCHP graduate student assistant Tori Deming.

Over the past year I’ve been digitizing the Donald Dewsbury still image collection. The collection includes over 4,000 black-and-white photographs and spans four decades.  Dewsbury took photographs of psychologists and animal behaviorists at various conference and meetings, including APA and Cheiron.

Most of the projects I’ve worked on have involved reintegrating separated photographs back into their original collections. I processed the Donald Dewsbury still images collection from start to finish and the collection was unique in the sense that I recognized many of the individuals from my time here at CCHP.

Like this guy.

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Back in the year 2000 when this photo was taken the CCHP was still AHAP and we were in the basement of an old department store. As a team under David Baker’s leadership we have come a long way!

 

And thanks to the generosity of this man and Dr. Dorothy Cummings we are now the Dr. Nicholas and Dorothy Cummings Center for the History of Psychology, a center which houses the Archives of the History of Psychology, The National Museum of Psychology, and the Institute for Human Science and Culture.

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Nicholas A. Cummings (1999, San Francisco, CA)

 

Here are a few of our current CCHP Board Members. They’re all so happy!

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Top (left to right): Florence Denmark (1992, Washington, DC), Ludy T. Benjamin, Jr. (1991, San Francisco, CA), Don Freedheim (1992, Brussels, Belgium), Rob Wozniak (1988, Bryn Mawr, PA).  Bottom (left to right): Lew Lipsitt (1989, New Orleans, LA), Chris “The Mustache” Green (1993, Toronto, Ontario), and Alexandra Rutherford (1999, Boston, MA)

 

I remembered Philip Zimbardo from his visit to the CCHP in 2015.

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Check out this great tie! Philip Zimbardo (1992, Washington, DC)

 

Since 2013 the Center has hosted the Ludy T. Benjamin, Jr. Distinguished Lecture in the History of Psychology. In 2015 we hosted Elizabeth Loftus and in 2017 we hosted Keith Humphreys.

Loftus and Humphreys

Don captured Elizabeth in 1994 in Seattle and Keith in 2003 in Toronto.

This year’s lecture is coming up on May 16 and the speaker is Laura Stark from Vanderbilt University. Register here! 

The familiar face that was most surprising was F. Robert Treichler. I know him as Dr. T.

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F. Robert Treichler (2000, Akron, OH)

I took Dr. T’s History of Psychology course when I was an undergraduate at Kent State University and he introduced me to my love of the subject. He also introduced me to the Center when he brought our class on a field trip in 2013. Seeing his face in this collection was exciting and reminded me of how my journey here all started.

As an amateur photographer myself, one of the things I appreciate most about this collection is how Don Dewsbury was able to capture the emotion of the subjects of his photographs.

These smiles are infectious!

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Top (left to right): Karl L. Wuensch (1983, Philadelphia, PA), Marie Lawrence (1988, Clemson, SC), Stanley Schneider (1991, San Francisco, CA). Middle (left to right): Stanley Graham (Washington, DC, 1992), Frank J. Sulloway (1989, Gainesville, FL), Thomas Carlson (1990, Southhampton, MA) Bottom (left to right): Mary S. Erskine (1992, Washington, DC)

 

The Donald Dewsbury still images collection is a treasure trove and we are so thankful that Don donated his collection to the archives. (We are equally thankful that he identified the subjects of nearly all of the images!)

Go ahead, browse the collection. You may just find yourself among the 4,295 photographs.

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Robert W. Matthews (1985, Raleigh, NC)

 

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contributed by Rose Stull & Laura Loop, students in the Museums & Archives Certificate Program.

The students in Foundations of Museums and Archives II have been working hard all semester, and invite you to attend our exhibit: How Animal Subjects Shaped Psychology, which opens on May 9 from 2:30-4:30pm.

The term “animal subjects” might make you think of those red-eyed, white rats in a laboratory. The history of animal subjects used in psychology is actually much broader than rats. Psychologists have conducted research using birds, insects, fish, and much more in addition to rats. Animal subjects have played an essential role in understanding “the basic principles and processes that underlie the behavior of all creatures, both human and nonhuman.” (Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in the Care and Use of Animals, American Psychological Association)

The Archives for the History of American Psychology houses many artifacts that were used in research with animal subjects. Some of the objects are part of larger collections with plenty of archival and primary source materials to help us identify them. However, others had very little information to begin with, and it was up to us to figure it out. The hardest part for some of the objects was just figuring out what it was. Are you able to figure out what these objects could be?

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What is this rack of droppers?

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Meat powder?

We had a general idea what most of the objects were used for but we still needed more. What was the object used for? Who used it? What kind of research were they doing? What were the findings of their research? We started in the archives and found a lot of what we were looking for, then expanded our research elsewhere to fill in the gaps.

Some of us learned about the history of experimental psychology for the first time. There are so many fabulous photographs.

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Gilbert Gottlieb ducklings

For example, Gilbert Gottlieb’s work with ducklings in his years of imprinting research has produced a multitude of amazing photographs (such as the photo shown above), which will be on display alongside many other archival materials regarding animal subjects.  A great example of this was the Animal Behavior Enterprises and their IQ Zoo. To learn more about this interesting tourist attraction and to see if you correctly identified these objects, the exhibit will be open through summer 2019.

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The fortune-telling chicken of the IQ Zoo

Working alongside our classmates with the wonderful staff at the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology has given us opportunity for hands-on experience that will give us better advantage in our respective fields of study at The University of Akron, and after graduation when we’re job hunting.  We are proud to invite everybody to join us for the opening of How Animal Subjects Shaped Psychology.

Opening Reception:

May 9th, 2019 from 2:30-4:30 pm

Free admission for the opening event. *Regular admission fees for the National Museum of Psychology during opening.

Location:

Institute for Human Science & Culture Galleries, RDWY 4th Floor

Drs. Nicholas & Dorothy Cummings Center for the History of Psychology; The University of Akron Roadway Building; 73 S. College Street Akron, OH 44325-4302

Contact: ihsc@uakron.edu ; 330-972-7285

This project fulfills the requirements for students in 1900:302 Foundations of Museums and Archives II at the Institute for Human Science and Culture. Contact Dr. Jodi Kearns jkearns@uakron.edu for information about the program.

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